The week ahead in fly fishing: May 15, 2107

Posted in Fishing Conditions, Fishing Reports, Smallmouth Bass Fishing, Trout Fishing, Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , , on May 16, 2017 by stflyfisher

Mother’s Day is upon us. For the male anglers out there, this was not the weekend to hit the water, perhaps, at best, a few hours. For the female anglers, of course, it is just like Father’s Day – hang up the sign – “Gone Fishing” and the day is yours.

Fields are plowed and the hills are greening up. Turkey season is now half over, or half begun, depending on your view.  The rainbows are mostly done spawning, and bass – both smallmouth and largemouth – have begun their amorous ways.

Water remains the theme in the Southern Tier. There’s been a lot of it, as last reported. Creeks, streams, and rivers are showing the excess. Here’s the latest data:

KBGM2017plot

Fly shop talk: Many of us have at least one person to thank for being in the wonderful sport of fly fishing. in many cases it’s a family member or close friend. And when it is someone close, the bond formed from that sharing can enrich the lives of both the teacher and student. Once given, the gift of angling never really goes away. In my case, my brother-in-law, whom I barely knew at the time, passed on this great gift. he took me to the famed West Branch of the Delaware on a July morning and on my own, using his tackle, landed a bright butter yellow 18″ brown. Call it beginner’s luck – that fish hooked me more than I hooked (and released) him. I’ve thanked Jeff ever since and this year built him a fly rod as a 60th birthday present. And while I learned things building the rod, perhaps the best part of it is that like teaching angling, that rod will also keep giving; to grandchildren, and on down the line. So what about you? have you thanked the person who got you into fly fishing?

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: Flows on the Salmon River have dropped and the fishing reports have been pretty good.

pineville514

Water temps are in the upper 40’s to low 50’s. The DSR is reporting some nice-sized Atlantics, along with steelhead, browns, smallmouth bass, and even walleye being landed. The fishing remains mixed, as are the methods, but there are some nice fish coming into the river as well as some steelhead dropping back.

Whitakers Sports Store and Motel is reporting that the water level dropped again over the weekend and finally a stretch of mild conditions is expected for later in the week. We still have a few drop backs hanging around and the lower end of the river has been producing the best action. Areas such as the Town Pool, Longbridge/Staircase and Black Hole has produced the best action early in the morning and later in the day. Depending on the day anglers who fished the DSR have reported getting into a mix of drop backs, Atlantic Salmon or smallmouth bass. For those anglers who are fly fishing, swinging streamers with sinking leaders has been most productive.

Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone reports that some stability with the weather is helping the Finger Lakes fishing.  Debris has settled out and water clarity has improved markedly.

  • Cayuga Lake:  Salmon and brown trout are distributed around the whole lake now for the most part.  Expect the same with browns and rainbows. Water temperatures are warming up and fish are moving out and deeper, though good numbers can be found in certain places shallow – but they are clearly scattering (which isn’t a bad thing). Lake trout jigging is good to very good.  Pickerel and perch are hitting well on the north end of the lake.
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing is fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  Lake trout jigging had been slow.  Expect fair to good pike action here.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout fishing is fair to good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout fishing should be good here. Perch fishing is very good. I expect good pike and rainbow trout fishing here this year.  Work is currently being done on the launches at Emerson Park.  At least one ramp is open from what I heard but it is a mess up there.  The Marina at the south end would probably be a better place to launch.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Yellow perch fishing is in full swing. Bonus bass, salmon and lakers are in the mix. I expect top-notch mixed bag fishing here now.  Smallmouth and rockbass should be starting to move up in large numbers.

Catskill Rivers: Generally speaking, the Catskill Rivers are high and largely unwadable. Fishing from a drift boat is the best way to fish the river system. 

  • The West Branch Angler is reporting that all rivers are still very clear after a weekend of some off and on rain. There are still some pretty prolific Blue Quill hatches on the West Branch and the Hendricksons slowed down a little bit this weekend but should pick back up as the temps creep up.  There are lots of caddis around lately too with some pretty good numbers of Apple caddis throughout the system. The streamer fishing has remained pretty good lately with the high volume of water currently in the system.
  • The Delaware River Club is reporting that the hendricksons are hatching well and the fish have been eating them. The water levels continue to drop and more wading opportunities are opening up. March browns are moving up the system and hopefully the caddis become more active in the sunshine.
  • Ken Tutalo of Baxter House Fly Fishing Outfitters reports that the action right now is very good in most places. Anglers can expect to find action with Dry Flies, Nymphs and Streamers. The Dry Fly is steady and reliable and most days from 3:00 until dark the trout are feeding heavily. There are some funnel points in the river that are so full of fish that it has been crazy. Hendrickson Duns and Spinners are on the menu on the tailwaters while March Browns and Caddisflies are happening on the freestones. Sulfurs should also join the mix any day now. There are also lots of Caddis on the water at this time. There are still Apple Caddis along with many others in various sizes. As far as location goes, the fish are totally spread out due to the heavy influx of mayflies. We are getting streamer strikes in every water type at this time.
  • Hatching:
    Hendrickson – #12 – 14 – Ephemerella subvaria
    Hendrickson – #16 – Ephemerella X
    Blue Quill – #16 – Paraleptophlebia. adaptiva
    March Brown – #10 -2xl – Maccaffertium vicarium
    Gray Fox – #12-2xl – Maccaffertium vicarium (Stenonema fuscum)
    Blue Wing Olives – #18 – Baetis sp.
    Dark Grannom – #14 – 18 – Brachycentrus spp.
    Apple Green Caddis #16 – 20 – Light Brachycentrus sp.
    Tan Caddis #16 – 18 – Hydropsyche spp.
    Little Black Caddis – #18-20 – Chimarra sp.

Local creeks: Local creeks got another god plug of water but are dropping and clearing as of this report. Streamers will be the best bet as long as flows and water clarity are off, but certainly by later this week, fishing should be back to normal. The warmer weather could provide some solid dry fly action. Fishing with nymphs and wets will always be productive as well.

Warmwater Rivers: Warmwater rivers are still too high for wading but are OK for fishing from a boat. The smaller rivers, like the Tioughnioga, will be first to clear and drop. It’s been hard to judge the prespawn with water levels and temps so variable but this week’s warmer weather is sure to kick it into high gear. Smaller rivers with lower flows will be the best bet for now, unless fishing from a boat. Fish water adjacent to shallow bays, tributary mouths, eddies, and shoreline structure. When the pre-spawn bite is on, large streamers will work well – smallies are typically aggressive and feeding up for two reasons – 1) their metabolism is picking up as water temps rise, and 2) they need to store up for the rigors of spawning.

Ponds: Ponds continue to warm and the largemouth bass are actively staging for spawning and in some cases may actually be on beds. Fishing will begin to pick up with warmer weather and this week’s climb into the 80’s will certainly help energizing the fish. Panfish will also be active. While it’s not popper time just yet, cruising fish could be tempted with large dry flies or a terrestrial pattern.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

The BC Flyfshers chapter FFI is featuring return speaker, Bruce Pencek for the May chapter meeting on Thursday, May 18 at the Endicott Public Library at 7:00 PM (informal tying demonstration at 6:30). The topic will be “American Tenkara Fishing”. Bruce Pencek returns from Virginia (via Hancock) to talk about American Tenkara – the translation of no-reel/fixed-line fly-fishing tackle and techniques from the mountain streams of Japan to the diverse waters and fish of North America. He will talk about selecting and rigging tenkara tackle and give his thoughts about how fixed-line rods have improved his success with western techniques – dry flies, Euro-style nymphing, even streamers – for trout, smallmouth, and carp. (With luck, he might have some illustrated tales about his fixed-line fishing in the Southern Tier in the days leading up to the talk.) He’ll provide some handouts with his recommendations for information sources and vendors. Before the talk, he’ll tie some of the flies he uses regularly.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

The low that gave us the showers and thunderstorms on Mother’s Day is spinning off the coast of Maine. This gave us some early clouds and showers. Skies will become partly cloudy, but it will be a cool and windy day. Winds diminish tonight and skies will be mostly clear. We’ll have partly cloudy skies on Tuesday with highs climbing into the 70s. We’ll be even warmer on Wednesday with highs in the 80s. With the warm, and slightly muggy weather, there could be a few scattered showers or thunderstorms. Showers and thunderstorms will be in the forecast for Thursday as a cold front comes through. Highs once again will be in the 80s. We’ll have partly cloudy skies with highs in the low 70s on Friday, with mostly sunny skies on Saturday. As a low moves in, we’ll have clouds and showers on Sunday and Monday with highs in the upper 60s to low 70s.

WBNG7Day

The week ahead in fly fishing: May 8, 2107

Posted in Uncategorized on May 9, 2017 by stflyfisher

Water, water, everywhere. That seems to be the theme in the Southern Tier most recently. For the fish it’s great, but for us land-born fly fishers, not so good. To date, Binghamton has recorded 20.33″ of precipitation, closing on almost double the historical norm.

KBGM2017plot

While temps have been within historical norms, precipitation is significantly high for the Southern Tier, year-to-date.

The rain and wind last week brought power outages, flooding, and turned the groud so saturated that trees are having a hard time standing upright.

Fly shop talk: I recently received a Cabelas “spring fly fishing” catalog – I get a lot of these types of catalogs from the big box retailers and peruse them and recycle them quickly. This one hung around for some reason, so I went through it more thoroughly one evening while waiting for dinner to cook. Paging through the fly rod section, I was both pleased and disappointed. I was pleased that there is so much choice, for one, and two, pleased in the excellent selection of fly rods that are easily affordable to those wishing to enter the sport on a budget. But I was troubled by the sheer volume of choice. For a beginning angler in particular, it must be overwhelming. There’s so much product differentiation out there – rod lengths, number of sections, actions, species, grade of components. It’s getting as bewildering as the choice of line type and reel types. Yeah for low cost and relatively high quality and performance for all but the cheapest of fly rods, but booo for the complexity, in my book.

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: Flows on the Salmon River in combination with the weather have had a negative impact on the fishing up north.

pineville

Some fish are being caught but wading is hazardous at this level.

 

 

Suggested patterns:

  • Wiggle stone in blue, peacock, chart, pink. size 10
  • Steelhead stone in purple, red, orange. size 8
  • Rusher nymph in blue, purple, chart, red. size 10
  • Steelhead hammer in blue, black, red, chart. size 10
  • Steak-n-eggs in chart, pink, orange. size 10
  • Black flashback nymph in size 8.
  • Sucker spawn in cream, white, peach, blue. size 8
  • Glo-Bugs in chart, oregon cheese, steelhead orange, egg. size 10

Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone reports generally good fishing conditions, as follows:

  • Cayuga Lake:  Salmon and brown trout are distributed around the whole lake now for the most part.  Expect the same with browns and rainbows.  I would expect lake trout jigging to be fairly slow with vast areas of muddy/murky water around. Pickerel, perch and some pike should be hitting well on the north end of the lake.
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing should be fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  Lake trout jigging had been slow.  No recent reports from here.  Expect fair to good pike action here.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout fishing is fair to good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout fishing should be good here. Perch fishing is very good. I expect good pike and rainbow trout fishing here this year.  Work is currently being done on the launches at Emerson Park.  At least one ramp is open from what I heard but it is a mess up there.  The Marina at the south end would probably be a better place to launch.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Yellow perch fishing is in full swing. Bonus bass and lakers are in the mix. Now’s a great time for rainbow trout and landlocked Atlantic salmon on the fly or on jigs.  Smallmouth and rockbass should be starting to move up.

Catskill Rivers: Generally speaking, the Catskill Rivers are high and largely unwadable. Fishing from a drift boat is the best way to fish the river system. 

  • The West Branch Angler is reporting the upper West Branch at Stilesville is currently 2,290 cfs and 51 degrees with some stain but it did clear some from weekend rains. Down at Hale Eddy the flow is 3,840 cfs and 49 degrees and quite a bit clearer than the weekend. The upper East at Harvard is flowing at 2,140 cfs and 48 degrees and is still a little clearer than the East below the Beaverkill at Fishs’ Eddy where the flow is 3,400 cfs and 49 degrees.  Water temps are pretty good now as is bug activity with fish rising in the afternoon hours in slack water sections on most of the branches.  Most anglers who have been catching fish and in some cases some big fish.  There are pretty good Blue Quills, Hendricksons and BWO’s and their spinners in the afternoon hours and in the right water the fish are feeding on top.  The upcoming week looks like we will get some reprieve from the rains and water levels can change quickly, especially if the reservoir quits spilling.

west branch hale eddy

  • The Delaware River Club is reporting that water levels are dropping but the East Branch drainage is dropping faster than the West.  Hendricksons, blue quills, and caddis are hatching but dry fly anglers will have to hunt to find the slower pools and tailouts where the fish will rise.  Streamers may be a good option while the water temps try to come up. Expect a warming trend to begin but staying cooler than the norm.  The water and cool air temperatures should keep the hatches going longer and carry over with cold water and decent flows through at least next week.
  • Ken Tutalo of Baxter House Fly Fishing Outfitters reports that fishing has been getting better, with a string of a few days in a row of great fishing. Tutalo reports that guests have been “crushing it.” The streamer bite is in high gear now and in the areas where Baxter House guides have been floating, you do not go very far without a big mature brown charging out at a properly fished baitfish imitation. The dry fly action has also been great especially late in the day. Over the last 4 days the Hendrickson’s have been blanketing the water. At times there have been so many insects accumulated that pods of fish have been crammed into small feeding lanes gorging themselves. Tutalo is reporting some big fish – lots of 20″+ fish with the best being just under 23 inches. With the clearing water, Tutalo feels it’s time to feed the beasts. Bite sized bait fish patterns are the way to go right now. The action with the 6″ plus streamers has slowed down considerably as the trout are moving back to their normal lairs. Most recently, 4″ bait fish stripped very erratically moved the most. Hendrickson duns are emerging in mass now from the tailwaters. Sunshine and light winds could produce the mother load of spinners to descend on the rivers.
  • Hatching:
    Hendrickson – #12 – 14 – Ephemerella subvaria
    Blue Quill – #16 – Paraleptophlebia. adaptiva
    Blue Wing Olives – #18 – Baetis sp.
    Little Black Caddis – #18-20 – Chimarra sp.
    Tiny Black Stonefly – #18 – Capniidae sp.
    Early Brown and Black Stoneflies – #14 – 16 – Taeniopteryx spp.

Local creeks: Local creeks are very high and chocolate brown to murky due to late week and weekend rains. If fishing the little waters, head upstream where the water clears and drops first. Streamers will be the best bet as long as the weather remains wet and cool to cold.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The East Branch of Owego Creek is just starting to drop and clear after very high flows over the past weekend.

Warmwater Rivers: Warmwater rivers are, for the most part, too high for wading and marginal for fishing from a boat. The smallmouth bass in some areas were reported to be staging around spawning habitat but with the river temps dropping now to the low 50’s due to recent cold weather, it’s likely the spawn is still off. Smaller rivers with lower flows may be fishable soon.

Ponds: Ponds are warming at a slower rate given the recent colder weather but until recently, the largemouth bass were beginning to stage for spawning.  Fishing will remain slow until we have a good string of warmer sunny days in conjunction with climbing nightly lows.

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

The BC Flyfshers chapter FFI is featuring return speaker, Bruce Pencek for the May chapter meeting on Thursday, May 18 at the Endicott Public Library at 7:00 PM (informal tying demonstration at 6:30). The topic will be “American Tenkara Fishing”. Bruce Pencek returns from Virginia (via Hancock) to talk about American Tenkara – the translation of no-reel/fixed-line fly-fishing tackle and techniques from the mountain streams of Japan to the diverse waters and fish of North America. He will talk about selecting and rigging tenkara tackle and give his thoughts about how fixed-line rods have improved his success with western techniques – dry flies, Euro-style nymphing, even streamers – for trout, smallmouth, and carp. (With luck, he might have some illustrated tales about his fixed-line fishing in the Southern Tier in the days leading up to the talk.) He’ll provide some handouts with his recommendations for information sources and vendors. Before the talk, he’ll tie some of the flies he uses regularly.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

Expect cold conditions to prevail for most of the week with the following day-by-day breakdown:

  • MONDAY: Mostly cloudy with showers, snow showers are possible. 0-.10″ rain, 0-T” snow 40% High 46 (44-48) Wind NW 10-15 G25 mph
  • MONDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy with rain and snow showers. 0-.05″ rain, 0-T” snow Low 32 (30-34) Wind W 3-8 mph
  • TUESDAY: Mostly cloudy with rain and snow showers. 0-.05″ rain, 0-T” snow 30% High 48 (45-50) Wind NW 3-8 mph
  • TUESDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy. Low: 34 Wind L&V
  • WEDNESDAY: Partly cloudy. High 54 Low 36
  • THURSDAY: Mostly cloudy with showers. 20% High 58 Low 42
  • FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy with showers. 30% High 60 Low 44
  • SATURDAY: Mostly cloudy with showers. 30% High 58 Low 44
  • SUNDAY: Mostly cloudy with showers. 30% High 58 Low 42

WBNG7Day58

The week ahead in fly fishing: April 24, 2107

Posted in Fishing Conditions, Fishing Reports, Flies - Local Favorites, Trout Fishing, Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , , on April 25, 2017 by stflyfisher

The last few weeks have been a roller coaster of high water events. The Southern Tier has certainly received a lot of rain, and in combination with saturated ground from previous snow melt, local creeks, streams, and rivers have all been full to overflowing. According to NOAA data, Binghamton is at 16.74″ of precipitation versus a historical norm of roughly 10″ for this time of year. So yes, it’s been a wet one. And Binghamton claimed the “snowiest city” award this year with 135.2″ total, edging out Syracuse. All of that is good for the fishies, especially after last year’s severe drought.

Fly shop talk: I recently watched a video on David Magnum, a fly fishing guide from Destin, Florida. David is addicted to Tarpon – 120 days of his season are focused on fly fishing for these brutes. The video reminded me that often in life, the enemy of the best is the good. In other words, rather than fly fishing the seasons, maybe one should focus on one fish species? One of the guides narrating the video talks about guides who pursue what’s biting for their clients, versus “fisherman guides” who will go all out for the targeted species even at the risk of a fish-less day. David Magnum “…dedicates his life to it, to one species – tarpon – and for him being hungry, and always wanting more, that makes him a better guide, and I think if you do that for 20 years or however long, when that’s all you think about is that one certain species 24/7, I think you will become better…”

Think about your own fly fishing and watch this video. Is the better fisherman narrow and deep, or wide and shallow? And what do you want your angling legacy to be?

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: Flows on the Salmon River are finally being dropped down to safe wadeable levels…

slmon river

The Douglaston Salmon Run is reporting pretty good fishing, overall. Water temperatures are holding at in the mid to upper 40’s and with flows down wading is better. Anglers in the lower river are hooking up with egg patterns, beads, and nymphs. Some smallmouth bass are starting to show up as well. The fish are mainly dropbacks with a few bright fish in the mix.

Whitakers is also reporting good fishing with the majority of anglers getting into some fish. Drop backs are scattered throughout the river from top to bottom. The mid to upper section of the river is also holding spawning fish in and around the gravel areas. For those anglers who are fly fishing, swinging streamers with sinking leaders or egg patterns and nymphs under a strike indicator have been the most productive. Anglers are also reporting having good luck at some of the smaller local tributaries.

Suggested patterns:

  • Wiggle stone in blue, peacock, chart, pink. size 10
  • Steelhead stone in purple, red, orange. size 8
  • Rusher nymph in blue, purple, chart, red. size 10
  • Steelhead hammer in blue, black, red, chart. size 10
  • Steak-n-eggs in chart, pink, orange. size 10
  • Black flashback nymph in size 8.
  • Sucker spawn in cream, white, peach, blue. size 8
  • Glo-Bugs in chart, oregon cheese, steelhead orange, egg. size 10

Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone reports that just as the lake is rising again after last week’s deluge and will wind up higher than it was before. It is already as high as it has been over the past two weeks.  There is some MASSIVE debris floating around. There are some monster logs floating around up north of Long Point. Expect tricky if not impossible launching at Taughannock. ALL LAKES ARE LIKELY HIGH NOW AND MAY BE VERY MUDDY IN AREAS. Skaneateles Lake is usually the least affected by heavy rainfall. Here’s John’s lake-by-lake report:

  • Cayuga Lake:  Lake trout jigging is good off of Long Point.  Salmon fishing was returning to top-notch form and then the rain came…
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing should be fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  Lake trout jigging was very slow over the weekend of the 1st/2nd.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout and yellow perch fishing should be good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout fishing should be good here. Perch fishing is very good.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Yellow perch fishing is in full swing. Bonus bass and lakers are in the mix. Now’s the time for top notch rainbow trout (with some Landlocked salmon) on the fly or on jigs.

Catskill Rivers: The West Branch Angler is reporting that flows are still but dropping at a slow but steady rate.  The West Branch is still too high for safe wading. All of the rivers are very clear and the streamer fishing has been pretty good and consistent throughout the system.  We saw quite a few bugs yesterday on all rivers but the fish are still a bit slow to look up.  If fishing, you will see rising fish but many are rising one or two times and then are done.  So, you have to be ready for any opportunity and get the fly over the fish quickly within a minute or so.  With this weeks warming temps we are anticipating the dry fly fishing to become more consistent and we should start to see more bugs every day.

Ken Tutalo of Baxter House Fly Fishing Outfitters reports that this weekend saw an interesting mix of weather conditions on the upper Delaware. Saturday was a tough day, it was windy, cold and winter like. Sunday was a beautiful spring day, with sun, warm weather and light winds which made for a great day on the water. This time of year sun and overnight lows are very connected to water temperatures and trout activity. Although, Sunday seemed to provide ideal conditions for great early season dry fly activity, Saturday night’s cold temperatures (below freezing) prevented the river from really coming to life. Over the weekend steady rising fish were found, but the activity was brief. Both days saw decent bug activity that was mostly ignored by the fish. This was because of cold water temps and wind. The cold water makes the fish lethargic, they really don’t have to eat much when the water is under 45°. It is still early season in the Catskills. However, the system is ready to pop. We are seeing more bugs every day. Expect to see solid dry fly activity as soon as weather conditions stay sunny for a few days.

The Delaware River Club is that streamers are still catching fish and hendricksons, blue quills, and black caddis are about.  The early hatches can be a bit sporadic in the beginning as they grow so be patient out there looking for risers.

Hatching:
Hendrickson – #12 – 14 – Ephemerella subvaria
Blue Quill – #16 – Paraleptophlebia. adaptiva
Quill Gordon – #14 – Epeorus pluralis
Blue Wing Olives – #18 – Baetis sp.
Little Black Caddis – #18-20 – Chimarra sp.
Tiny Black Stonefly – #18 – Capniidae sp.
Early Brown and Black Stoneflies – #14 – 16 – Taeniopteryx spp.

Local creeks: Local creeks were looking very good before last weeks heavy rains but now are very full and somewhat murky.

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Looking upstream on the upper East Branch of Owego Creek…

Water is still cold but the warm sunny days are bringing the bugs out – small mayflies and even some caddis. Stocking continues. Keep streamers handy but also have a nice selection of nymphs, sets, and dries handy.

Ponds: Ponds are clear of ice and slowly starting to warm. Fishing will remain slow until we have a good string of warmer sunny days and nightly lows climb.

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

  • The Al Hazzard chapter of TU is holding its Annual River Clean-up on Saturday, April 29 from 9 am to noon at the Fireman’s Park in Deposit. It’s suggested to bring work gloves and boots. All volunteers can help themselves to coffee and donuts at 9 am and then hot dogs and hamburgers at noon. Bring your fishing gear and enjoy an afternoon of fly fishing after serving the river right!
  • The Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter of FFI will hold its May meeting on Monday, May 1st at 7 pm. Henry Ramsey will be presenting, “Matching and Fishing the Sulphur Hatch”. Henry will teach on how to fish the sulfur hatch and what flies to use. The various species of mayflies characterized by fly fishers as sulfurs are very prolific in our area and in Pennsylvania. They provide local anglers many opportunities to catch trout on the nymph, emerger, dry fly, and spinner patterns that duplicate those insects. This presentation will go into the various stages of these insects’ lives and the imitations Henry uses to fish them. Henry is our third co-author of the new Keystone Fly Fishing book. He is an extremely innovative and talented fly tier and speaker. He also co-authored Matching Major Eastern Hatches, which catalogs many of his favorite fly patterns. His tying work has been featured in several publications including the Art of Angling Journal; The Game Journal; Fly Fisherman; and the Mid Atlantic Fly Fishing Guide. He is a contract fly designer for Umpqua Feather Merchants and is a member of the Daiichi Hook and Regal Vise Pro Staffs. If you want to catch more trout this year on sulfurs, you won’t want to miss this presentation. Prior to his presentation, Henry will be tying one or more of his patterns. Also at the May meeting the chapter will be holding its Musky Fly Raffle, raffling off the Flathead Sucker Musky Streamer shown in the Fly of the Month write-up in last month’s Newsletter. This is the actual fly that Joe Goodspeed tied at our March meeting. If you are a musky fisherman you will certainly want to have this fly in your box. Raffle tickets will go for $5 per ticket and will be sold during our May meeting.
  • Although still a few weeks away, the Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter of FFI is starting to plan their annual trip to the Cohocton River. This trip is usually quite productive, with fresh-stocked browns added just a few weeks prior to our outing. The trip is scheduled for Saturday, May 6, 2017 and is being coordinated by Matt Towner. If you are going please contact Matt at 607-542-0285 or mtowner23@gmail.com, as enough food needs to be purchased for all who attend. The trip will depart from Corning Wegmans @ 9:00 AM. We usually start fishing in Avoca near the King farm and lunch will be held at the picnic area there. Once we arrive, the group will usually disperse from there up or down river to everyone’s favorite fishing spots. A few places even hold native brook trout that always put up a good fight. There are usually quite a few caddis to be found on the surface in early May, so be sure to include those in the flies that you bring
  • The Eastern Waters Council of IFFF, parent organization of the BC Flyfishers and Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter, is having a contest to bring in new members, called “Giving the Gift Of Membership”. The contest is to encourage current members to buy an IFFF membership as a gift to a fly fishing friend, fishing buddy, or family member. You will be entered in a raffle for a new Sage Rod and Reel. To enter the contest, call Kat Mulqueen (406-222-9369 X106) at IFFF headquarters, tell her you are from the BCFF chapter or TTFR chapter, Eastern Waters Council and that you want to participate in the Giving the Gift of Membership. You will need to provide the giftee name, address and email and pay for their membership. There is also a prize for the club that brings in the most new members. You will be helping your buddy, your Club and the IFFF, and you will be eligible to win an awesome new rod and reel! The contest ends May 1st.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

Quiet weather and clear skies look to dominate the local weather until early Tuesday morning. On Tuesday, a low pressure system that’s working northward up the East Coast could push some moisture into our area with northeasterly winds, especially in the morning on Tuesday.

A separate low-pressure system then looks to stroll through the Great Lakes on Thursday, bringing with it a cold front that could bring some more rain showers and even a few thunderstorms across the Twin Tiers.

The same can also be said for Friday, except instead of a cold front drifting through our area, the warm front from a third low-pressure system could waft across our area, perhaps providing enough warmth, moisture, and instability for a few more showers and storms Friday and into Saturday.

WBNG7Day

 

BC Flyfishers “simply tie” with guide flies

Posted in Flies - Local Favorites, Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , , , on April 6, 2017 by stflyfisher

The BC Flyfishers (BCFF) chapter of IFFF just completed another innovative fly tying class. But unlike the previous two classes the chapter has offered, this one focused on very simple flies. Fly tying, after all, doesn’t have to be complicated, expensive, or arduous and time-consuming. And contrary to what some might think, the best flies are simple in design and less than perfectly imitative. These flies are often termed “guide flies”. Why, you may ask?

killer bugs

Frank Sawyer’s Killer Bug is an example of an extremely simple fly that was designed to catch greyling in English streams. The BCFF Guide Fly Tying class included a U.S. version of this fly, called the Utah Killer Bug.

In order to be effective, guides must be efficient. The rigs they tie for clients must work, and the flies used must catch fish for all clients, even for those with little to no fly fishing experience. While a guide can’t promise fish, repeated trips with poor results will mean less referrals and less income. As is said with any kind of business; no margin – no mission. So guide flies make for quick, inexpensive ties that catch fish. And the BC Flyfishers last tying class focused exclusively on these fly fishing marvels.

The Guide Flies fly tying class consisted of four weekly tying “chapters”, each taught by different tiers: John Trainor (BCFF board member and local angler), Tim Barrett (BCFF board member and NY State Guide), Joe Cambridge (Local angler and author), and Kevin Gilroy (Local angler and commercial tier). The classes ranged from a refresher on tying basics to tying simple nymphs, wets, streamers, and a few more involved dry flies. In addition to the lead fly tiers for each class, up to seven helpers – BCFF members with fly tying experience – were on hand to assist each participant with tying issues.

Week One, led by John Trainor, started with a refresher on tying basics that included starting the thread on the hook, pinch wraps, dubbing techniques, and whip finishing. Along with the basics was a primer on nymph guide flies. The featured fly for this class was the Frenchie. Derived from the Pheasant tail, The Frenchie is used in competition nymphing and is a great guide fly because it is fast to tie. It typically sports a hot spot and sometimes a collar, as shown below:

frenchie

“The Frenchie”

Other patterns tied in the class were Walt’s Worm (a classic), Ackourey’s Nymph (Joe Ackourey is a PA guide), and the Utah killer Bug.

utah killer bug

The Utah Killer Bug

Week Two, led by Tim Barrett, featured some proven patterns that are fast to tie and are used not only by guides, but in competition fly fishing as well. Some are modified versions of flies that have been simplified so many can be tied in an hour’s time. The featured fly was Tim Barrett’s favorite, Tim’s Simpupa. This fly originally is tied with a soft hackle collar but for simplicity’s sake, the hackle can be substituted with a coarsely dubbed collar or peacock herl,  as shown below.

simpupa

Tim’s Simpupa

Also included was another of Tim’s favorite fish-catcher’s – The Turd. The Turd imitates a variety of stoneflies or can be fished as an attractor. The pattern’s rubber legs seem to be a good trigger for fish.

turd

The Turd. Tim Barrett likes to tie in a hot spot collar below the bead and use differently colored or finished beads, his favorite being black. The chenille body color can also be varied.

Tim also demonstrated tying Tim’s Carpet Fly, Doppelganger, and Glass-O–Wine – all great nymph patterns.

Week Three, led by local fly fishing legend Joe Cambridge, focused on tying soft hackle flies and one streamer pattern. Cambridge started his class with soft hackles, a favorite fly type of his, and in his opinion, very underrated. Cambridge was first introduced to soft hackles by an uncle while fly fishing in the UK. Like most people who first see these sparsely tied flies, Cambridge dismissed their effectiveness but brought some back with him to the states at his uncle’s urging. He stashed the tin of flies in his vest but never touched them until he encountered a fish-less day on a Catskill river. As Joe tells it, fish were rising everywhere and refusing EVERYTHING he threw at them. He then thought of his uncle’s soft hackles and figured “what do I have to lose.” The trout jumped these sparsely tied flies with abandon and he was sold forevermore on their effectiveness.

Soft hackles are simple but can be a bit more challenging to tie. They are generally nothing more than silk thread, dubbing in some cases, and hackle. And they can be fished in a variety of ways.

Joe’s last fly was a streamer that he considers absolutely deadly on his home water – the Finger Lakes trbis. The Fatal Attraction, shown below, is actually a Don Blanton pattern that originates on the West Coast.

fatal attraction

In the last class, Week Four, the class was introduced to some very fishy dry flies, courtesy of Kevin Gilroy, a commercial fly tier. From the classic Red Quill to Kelly Galloup’s Butch Caddis…

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Galloup’s Butch Caddis (courtesy of slideinn.com)

…all of the patterns tied belong in every serious angler’s fly box. One featured fly, the Sparkle Dun, is similar to the famous Comparadun. This fly has had its share of success and can be tied in several variations to simulate different types of bugs.

pmd-sparkledun-2

The Sparkle Dun

So there you have it: take four weekly sessions of learning to tie guide flies, add 4 top-notch fly tying teachers, instructional material and videos, pre-made tying kits for each of 16 fly patterns, and spend 16 hours at the vise practicing, and what does one get? 19 happy fly tiers with a new perspective on fly tying; good fish-catching flies can be cheap, fast and easy to tie, AND effective…

fly tying

Happy Guide Fly graduates…

The week ahead in fly fishing: April 3, 2107

Posted in Uncategorized on April 3, 2017 by stflyfisher

The traditional opening of trout fishing was pretty much a blow-out for most local creeks and streams. Earlier last week it looked like it was shaping up to be a nice opener but that was not to be, thanks to the already mid to high flow levels and then more snow melt and a long soaking rain on Friday. So it is with early season fly fishing. Be thankful that there’s a lot of water in the hills to last us hopefully through spring and into early summer.

Fly shop talk: Before wading into the 2017 fishing season, anglers should remember the law of good karma – that good intent and good deeds can contribute to good karma and future happiness, while bad intent and bad deeds contribute to bad karma and future suffering. Another version of this is the Golden Rule; to do unto others as you would have done to you. I was reminded of this while watching the tuna fishing reality show, Wicked Tuna. In it, a reputably “bad boy” captain with a greedy reputation in previous episodes seemed to change his ways. Playing a big bluefin tuna around anchored fishing boats can be tricky and the big tuna he had wrapped the line around an anchor line for another boat. The captain of the anchored boat saw what was happening and released his boat from the anchor line so that “bad boy” captain could untangle his tuna line and regain control of the fish. Even though the fish was eventually lost, the “bad boy” captain later admitted in the old days he’d simply cut the other boat’s anchor line. Turns out, his boat, The Pinwheel, is leading in the series standings. Of course that payback doesn’t always happen, but then again payback shouldn’t be expected. The point is the root of true happiness is all about giving and not taking.

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: The Douglaston Salmon Run reports mixed results with some anglers hooking up and others not. Some of the best steelhead fishing will soon be at hand as water temps begin to warm and the fish spawn and then begin to drop back. Spring is also a great time to mix it up with pre-spawn smallmouth bass, that enter the river to also spawn.

Whitakers is reporting that some steelhead are being taken in the Upper Fly Zone, however, high water is making for difficult conditions.

pineville usgs 40217

Nymphs and egg patterns are producing the best results for fly anglers. Some steelhead are being taken around the Ellis Cove area with egg sacs producing the best results. With the high water the fish have been holding along the inside seams and softer water along the edges of the deeper holes and runs. The fish have also been holding in and around the deep water adjacent to the gravel areas. For those anglers who are not comfortable with the high water, some of the smaller local tributaries are another option. On Friday, the DEC started the steelhead egg collection at the hatchery.

Suggested patterns:

  • Wiggle stone in blue, peacock, chart, pink. size 10
  • Steelhead stone in purple, red, orange. size 8
  • Rusher nymph in blue, purple, chart, red. size 10
  • Steelhead hammer in blue, black, red, chart. size 10
  • Steak-n-eggs in chart, pink, orange. size 10
  • Black flashback nymph in size 8.
  • Sucker spawn in cream, white, peach, blue. size 8
  • Glo-Bugs in chart, oregon cheese, steelhead orange, egg. size 10

Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone reports that it’s starting to feel a lot like spring outside. The heavy rain we received has the Finger Lake tribs running high.  Lake levels are rising and most launches should not provide too many problems.  Expect all lakes to be at full pool or very close by then.

Here’s John’s lake-by-lake report:

  • Cayuga Lake:  Fly-fishing and casting with gear has been very good for landlocked salmon and brown trout along with occasional rainbows and lakers.  Lake trout jigging is also good and should be lakewide.  Perch fishing should be very good.
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing is currently fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  I would expect good lake trout jigging here as well as good perch fishing.  I should have a report soon.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout and yellow perch fishing should be good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout fishing should be good here.  Perch fishing is very good. Lake level is about a foot below full pool.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Rainbow trout, landlocked salmon and yellow perch fishing should be good here.  The State Launch is finally open and docks are in.

Catskill Rivers: The West Branch Angler is reporting that there are high water levels throughout the Catskill rivers system. Despite the higher water all of the rivers are in good to great shape with a nice green tint to them. The release from Cannonsville is going to continue into this coming week to keep a void in the reservoir to collect spring rains.  Streamer fishing is the best bet with this volume of water and fishing slowly and thoroughly in likely-looking sections of slower water is a good game plan.  The runoff and feeder streams will continue to drop as long as it stays dry.

The Delaware River Club is warning anglers to not wade until the river levels drop.  It’s possible to throw streamers from a boat or shore right now and that fishing should improve over the next week as the water temperatures rise along with the air temperatures.  It won’t take long to get going.

Air temperatures should be in the 50’s a couple of days this week and will make fishing much more comfortable.  There are a few stoneflies around but dry fly action is a distant long shot until the flow drops a bit and the water temperatures rise.  If you fish your best bet will be to slow strip, swing, or jig streamers in quieter, deep eddys.

Hatching:
Tiny Black Stonefly – #18
Early Brown and Black Stoneflies – #14 – 16

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“Home Pool” on the West Branch of the Delaware River on Opening Day morning. All Catskill rivers were high and generally unwadeable. Picture courtesy of the Delaware River Club.

Local creeks: Local creeks were looking very good just two days prior to the opener but Fridays steady rains on top of saturated ground put an end to that. Stocking has been hit and miss – some waters were stocked later than normal due to the high flows earlier in the week. Best bet will be streamers and small stonefly nymphs or worm imitations.

Ponds: Ponds are finally ice-free for the most part. Fishing will be very slow until we have some warmer sunny days and nightly lows consistently climb above freezing.

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

  • The Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter of IFFF will be holding their April meeting tonight, April 3 at 7 pm at the Big Flats Community Center, 476 Maple Street, Big Flats. Dave Rothrock will talk about “Trout Hatches and Their Imitations.” Dave is one of the co-authors on the new Keystone Fly Fishing book. He is a well-known speaker and writer on all things fly fishing and has written for Fly Fisherman magazine and other fly fishing related publications. Prior to his talk, Dave will be tying one of his fly patterns. Dave’s presentations are always interesting and thought provoking, and his fly patterns are ones that you’ll want to have in your box.
  • It’s still not too late to sign up for the Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter of IFFF’s Fly Fishing Academy, scheduled for Saturday, April 8, 2017, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. This year marks the TT5R’s 10th anniversary for the Annual Fly Fishing Academy. The event will be held at the Campbell-Savona High School in Campbell, NY. This is a high quality fly fishing course, open to Adults and to Youth 11 yrs old and over. 
    This full day class is designed for beginner and intermediate fly fishers to develop and expand techniques and skills. The day includes three casting sessions led by a Certified Casting Instructor. Learning sessions throughout the day are taught by fly fishers with vast experience and include fly fishing strategy, knot tying, gear selection, fly selection, getting started with trout and bass, and more. Nymph, dry fly and streamer techniques are demonstrated in a full-scale model stream. Lunch and snacks are provided. No equipment is necessary. Class fee is $85 for Adults (ages 16 and over); $40 for Youth (ages 11-15, accompanied by a registered Adult). TTFR Members are also eligible for a $10 discount. Space is limited and filled last year, so you are encouraged to register early. Prepaid registration is required by Fri., March 31st. Contact Steve Harris 607-377-4956 sjh529@stny.rr.com or Kirk Klingensmith 607-346-7189 kklingensmi@stny.rr.com.
  • The BC Flyfishers will be holding their next monthly chapter meeting on Thursday, April 20, at 7:00 pm. A fly tying demo by chapter member Mike Thornton will start at 6:30 pm. The general meeting presentation will be given by chapter members Tim Barrett and Mike Norton who will introduce you to the world of Competitive Fly Angling. As will be seen in their presentation, competitive angling participants must not only demonstrate their fly angling prowess on streams but also in lakes using three fly rigs. Competitive fly angling is controversial among fly anglers – most either love it or hate it – and few are impartial. Tim Barrett, NYS guide, and Mike Norton will be discussing what goes into competitive fly fishing and what things we use today in our own style of fly fishing that are commonly used in competitive fly angling. Both Tim and Mike have participated in several competitive events, from the smaller AuSable Two-fly Challenge in Wilmington, NY to several regional qualifiers for the US team. They will discuss the format of a competition, common rules, equipment, techniques, and conservation efforts.
  • The Eastern Waters Council of IFFF, parent organization of the BC Flyfishers and Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter, is having a contest to bring in new members, called “Giving the Gift Of Membership”. The contest is to encourage current members to buy an IFFF membership as a gift to a fly fishing friend, fishing buddy, or family member. You will be entered in a raffle for a new Sage Rod and Reel. To enter the contest, call Kat Mulqueen (406-222-9369 X106) at IFFF headquarters, tell her you are from the BCFF chapter or TTFR chapter, Eastern Waters Council and that you want to participate in the Giving the Gift of Membership. You will need to provide the giftee name, address and email and pay for their membership. There is also a prize for the club that brings in the most new members. You will be helping your buddy, your Club and the IFFF, and you will be eligible to win an awesome new rod and reel! The contest ends May 1st.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

Dry weather for Sunday and Monday has given local creeks, streams, and rivers time to catch up and recede below minor flood stage in all areas. They will continue to recede through Monday night. High pressure will continue its reign over the area for a majority of the day Monday, though clouds will be on the increase ahead of our next low-pressure system, which is set to enter the area after sunset on Monday. Showers, and a few rumbles of thunder, are then possible on Tuesday as that rain-maker strolls through.

Between 0.50″ and 1.25″ of total rainfall is possible once the showers exit the area Tuesday night. With this said, we will continue to keep our eyes on rising rivers, as they are expect to rise again after receding on Sunday and Monday. Some low-end moderate flooding is possible come midweek, but there continues to be no indication of any major flooding at any location in our area.

High pressure moves through briefly Wednesday, putting a dry period between weather-makers, as another low-pressure system rolls through for the end of the work week, with some thunder again being possible.

WBNG7Day

The week ahead in fly fishing: March 27, 2107

Posted in Fishing Conditions, Fishing Reports, Trout Fishing, Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , , , on March 26, 2017 by stflyfisher

The traditional opener of trout fishing is less than a week away. After throwing a late winter curve ball that blanketed the Southern Tier with up to 3 feet of snow, Mother Nature’s reversal could make local creeks, streams, and rivers swollen and moving for Saturday’s opening day. Until the weekend, though temps were on the increase, it was a very gradual trend with below freezing temps at night. Cross your fingers that we don’t get to flooding conditions and retain some of that beautiful early spring snowpack.

Fly shop talk: It’s that time of the season where NY’s DEC gears up for stocking local creeks and streams with hatchery-reared brown trout. Local ponds and lakes typically receive rainbows. Hopefully flows will be reasonable given the current ground saturation, snow pack, and expectation for rain and warmer temperatures. Stocked trout are not everyone’s idea of trout fishing but they can help shake off the winter casting rust and let’s face it, feeling the tug is a nice way to start the season off. If you know someone looking to get started in the sport, early season stockies are the ticket. A simple 3 – 5 weight outfit and a basic selection of flies (stonefly nymphs, wet flies, wooly buggers and small streamers) are all that’s needed. Stocked trout typically take a fly pretty aggressively and if dead-drifting is not working, it can pay to put some movement in the fly. But don’t take stockies for granted. In his wonderful book, Trout Tactics, Joe Humphreys discusses “conditioning” of trout and how some familiar circumstances can turn trout on to feeding. He tells of a case where he was fishing a stocked stream with, as he put it,”plenty of company”. No one, even the great Joe, was having any luck. After a while, one angler threw a handful of pebbles across the stream. Guess what happened? The trout suddenly turned on to feeding. The reason? Stoked trout are conditioned to feeding from above when automatic feeders spread pellets across the holding tanks. The pebbles imitated this and triggered the trout to feed!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Early season stockie…

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: The Douglaston Salmon Run reports that flows have dropped to very nice levels but the fishing seems to remain a mix.

Flows have dropped from an initial flow of 1150 all the way down to 750. Warming temps have also attracted more anglers to the run. Swinging streamers, fishing stonefly nymphs, and egg patterns have all produced. Whitakers reports that the drop in water level has helped get a few more anglers out on the water. Anglers stopping into the shop who fished the Lower Fly Zone reported landing some steelhead on a mix of nymphs and single egg patterns. Other anglers who fished the upper section of river between Altmar and Pineville reported landing some steelhead while bottom bouncing and float fishing with blue egg sacs. In the lower end of the river anglers who fished the DSR reported landing some steelhead while swinging flies or bottom bouncing and float fishing with egg sacs. There are steelhead also being landed at some of the smaller local tributaries.

Suggested patterns:

  • Wiggle stone in blue, peacock, chart, pink. size 10
  • Rusher nymph in blue, purple, chart. size 10
  • Steelhead hammer in black, red, blue. size 8
  • Steelhead stone in purple, red, orange. size 8
  • Sucker spawn in blue, cream, white, peach. size 8
  • Steak-n-eggs in pink, orange, chart. size 10
  • Steelhead bugger in size 8.

pineville

Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone reports that things are back to normal in the Central NY Region for this time of year.

Here’s John’s lake-by-lake report:

  • Cayuga Lake:  Fly-fishing  and casting with gear has been productive for landlocked salmon and brown trout along with occasional rainbows and lakers.  Lake trout jigging is also productive.  The water level has come up quite a bit and launching shouldn’t be a problem at most launches – at least for now!
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing is currently fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  Very few boats were out of Watkins Glen perch fishing when we went out.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout fishing should still be good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout fishing should be good here.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Rainbow trout, landlocked salmon and yellow perch fishing should be good here.

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

  • It’s still not too late to sign up for the Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter of IFFF’s Fly Fishing Academy, scheduled for Saturday, April 8, 2017, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. This year marks the TT5R’s 10th anniversary for the Annual Fly Fishing Academy. The event will be held at the Campbell-Savona High School in Campbell, NY. This is a high quality fly fishing course, open to Adults and to Youth 11 yrs old and over. 
    This full day class is designed for beginner and intermediate fly fishers to develop and expand techniques and skills. The day includes three casting sessions led by a Certified Casting Instructor. Learning sessions throughout the day are taught by fly fishers with vast experience and include fly fishing strategy, knot tying, gear selection, fly selection, getting started with trout and bass, and more. Nymph, dry fly and streamer techniques are demonstrated in a full-scale model stream. Lunch and snacks are provided. No equipment is necessary. Class fee is $85 for Adults (ages 16 and over); $40 for Youth (ages 11-15, accompanied by a registered Adult). TTFR Members are also eligible for a $10 discount. Space is limited and filled last year, so you are encouraged to register early. Prepaid registration is required by Fri., March 31st. Contact Steve Harris 607-377-4956 sjh529@stny.rr.com or Kirk Klingensmith 607-346-7189 kklingensmi@stny.rr.com
  • The Eastern Waters Council of IFFF, parent organization of the BC Flyfishers and Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter, is having a contest to bring in new members, called “Giving the Gift Of Membership”. The contest is to encourage current members to buy an IFFF membership as a gift to a fly fishing friend, fishing buddy, or family member. You will be entered in a raffle for a new Sage Rod and Reel. To enter the contest, call Kat Mulqueen (406-222-9369 X106) at IFFF headquarters, tell her you are from the BCFF chapter or TTFR chapter, Eastern Waters Council and that you want to participate in the Giving the Gift of Membership. You will need to provide the giftee name, address and email and pay for their membership. There is also a prize for the club that brings in the most new members. You will be helping your buddy, your Club and the IFFF, and you will be eligible to win an awesome new rod and reel! The contest ends May 1st.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

Rain showers will continue rolling through the Southern Tier in waves for the next few days, and some fog or low clouds are also possible with a very moist atmosphere. Rainfall and snow melt may cause low-end moderate flooding at some locations. The chance of moderate flooding has decreased in the past 24 hours. However, there is still the chance of low-end moderate flooding come the first half of the week. There is no indication of any major impacts from flooding after these rain showers, and any flooding similar to the 2011 flood is out of the question. The seasonable temperatures we’ve had over the weekend will continue and even warm into the mid-50s through next week. High pressure then slides into our area come the second half of the week, keeping skies mainly clear and keeping temperatures above average to wrap up the work week.

WBNG7Day

The Fly Fishing Academy – priming anglers for spring…

Posted in Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , on March 25, 2017 by stflyfisher

The date of April 1st is a great motivator for most anglers in New York. These days it’s less functionally significant for the fly fisher – many trout waters, for example, are open all year under special regulations – but for the bait fishers and those who keep what they catch, the date remains a true season opener. Still, April 1st just rings well on a few fronts – tradition, the potential for spring-like weather, and lastly, a true opening for the year in fishing on most waters and for most species.

In step with the opening of the spring fishing season, the Twin Tiers Five Rivers (TT5R) chapter of IFFF offers its Fly Fishing Academy. Before delving into the particulars of this event, I’ll provide a history to its past, courtesy of current chapter President, Kirk Klingensmith.

2016.04.02 FFFAcademy-6684

TT5R chapter President Kirk Klingensmith uses a unique floor map of a trout stream to demonstrate presentation techniques to trout at the TT5R Fly Fishing Academy.

The TT5R was chartered as an IFFF chapter in 2000. The chapter started its first year with a mission focus on education, teaching fly fishing by holding a casting seminar. Three years later, the event took on a form closer to Ithaca Fishing Day where many in the public were welcomed to try the sport through fly tying, casting, knot tying, and other fly fishing skills. These early events featured a very popular catch and release trout pond for youth and introduced fly fishing to an estimated 200-300 per year. Though the revised format introduced a lot of people to the sport, TT5R leadership did not feel the approach was providing attendees enough detailed knowledge to retain their interest in the sport over the long term.

In 2006, the chapter decided to revise the event format to that of a full day fishing school. Kirk Klingensmith, current President of the chapter, led the organization of the first “Academy” as well as developing the curriculumn. Initial staff included Joe and Carol Cambridge (Joe still teaches at the Academy) and Dave Rothrock. Both Dave and Joe have written for Fly Fisherman magazine and are known nationally.

This year will be the chapter’s 10th year of the Academy format. Unlike the original events, the Fly Fishing Academy is now more student-focused with a limited class size of 25-32 students per year. TT5R leadership has found that students pick up the sport more effectively through this format. The Academy has introduced or advanced fly fishing for over 300 people in this way.

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Fly Fishing Academy graduates, eager to hit the water…

The TT5R staff currently includes Chas Elliott, IFFF Certified Casting Instructor. Chas trained for over 2 years to achieve this casting certification. Three others on staff have been formally trained in casting instruction. Teaching staff includes fly fishers with well over 100 years of combined experience. Over the years, Kirk Klingensmith estimates TT5R has introduced fly fishing to 1,500-2,000 people.

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Casting instruction is a major component of the curriculum of TT5R’s Fly Fishing Academy.

This year the Fly Fishing Academy will be held on Saturday, April 8, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, at the Campbell-Savona High School in Campbell, NY. It’s open to adults and to youth, 11 yrs old and over. The class provides beginner fly fishers with the basic knowledge and skills to get started, and will help those familiar with the sport onto a fast track to improvement. Classroom topics include fly fishing equipment and its use, fly types and their usage, knot tying, reading water, basic entomology, fishing dry flies, streamers, and nymphs, and how to properly catch and release fish. Most importantly, students will get a chance to develop fly casting skills through three sessions throughout the day. Students can bring and learn on their own equipment but are welcome to use the club’s equipment. More than 15 members and fly fishing experts will be staffing the school this year. Kirk Klingensmith is the Lead Instructor for the Academy and Chas Elliott will lead the fly casting staff.

Class fee is $85 for Adults (ages 16 and over); $40 for Youth (ages 11-15, accompanied by a registered Adult). TTFR Members are also eligible for a $10 discount. Space is limited and the class filled quickly last year, so early registration is encouraged. Also this year is filling even faster. If considering enrollment, get your reservations in soon. Do not miss your chance to attend this excellent school to start or advance your skills. Prepaid registration is required by Fri., March 31st. Contact Steve Harris at 607-377-4956 or by email at sjh529@stny.rr.com or Kirk Klingensmith at 607-346-7189 or by email at kklingensmi@stny.rr.com.