Archive for February, 2017

The week ahead in fly fishing: February 27, 2107

Posted in Fishing Conditions, Fishing Reports, Trout Fishing, Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , , , on February 26, 2017 by stflyfisher

Spring certainly visited the Southern Tier with gusto this past week. Record temperatures were set with highs, at times, hitting the low 70’s. And those high temperatures went to work on the snow pack, swelling local creeks, streams, and rivers with snow-melt. Most ponds and smaller lakes are largely ice-free and all of our snow is gone. As nice as it was to get a tease of spring and even early summer, let’s hope the weather returns to normal and some of the white stuff hits the ground again.

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The East Branch of Owego Creek flows high and turbid with snow melt in this picture taken on Friday, February 24.

Fly shop talk: I’ve recently been attending the BC Flyfisher’s fly tying class, learning how to tie guide flies. The class has provided an opportunity to connect with other anglers, shake off the fly tying rust, and learn how to tie some simple but very effective fly patterns. Guide flies are fish catchers – cheap in material use and fast to tie. And as John Trainor stated in one of the first two classes, when you lose some of the nymphs to the bottom, which you should be doing if you are fishing where you should be, you don’t mind losing them in comparison to a more technical fly that you just purchased at a fly shop. Guide flies are probably the epitome of effectiveness and tying them should remind us all that fly fishing need not be as pricey or “difficult” as it is sometimes portrayed. Going forward this year, I’ll be carrying plenty of these patterns in my vest, but more so, I’ll try to keep my fly fishing just like these guide flies – efficient and effective.

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: The Douglaston Salmon Run has been reporting poorer results lately, mainly due to river conditions. Most of the snow is melted and the run-off has really kicked flows up significantly. Whitaker’s is reporting the much same and advises anglers to check river flows before venturing out.

 

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Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone reports that water temperatures are in the 41 degree range on the surface of the larger Finger Lakes. The action over the past three days has been good to very good for the most part. Here’s his lake-by-lake report:

 

  • Cayuga Lake:  Fishing has been productive for landlocked salmon and brown trout along with occasional rainbows and lakers.  Both fly-and gear fishing are working.   The water level is low here and launching and retrieving boats could be a hassle for some. Lake trout jigging is good to very good.
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing is currently fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  Perch and pike fishing should be good.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout fishing should still be good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout and northern pike fishing should be good here.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Rainbow trout, landlocked salmon and yellow perch fishing should be good here.

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

  • The Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter of IFFF will be holding its next monthly chapter meeting on Monday, March 6th. Make sure to mark your calendars because this will be a good one. Joe Goodspeed, Sales Rep. for Thomas and Thomas, will be visiting to talk about Fly Fishing for Muskies. Joe is known for being a very diversified fly fisher who thinks outside the box and targets many different species. His talks are always interesting. Prior to his presentation, Joe will be tying a fly he uses for musky fishing. Joe always has some interesting stories and techniques to share, so you will not what to to miss this presentation. Fly tying demo will start at 6:30 pm, with the presentation starting at 7:00, at the Big Flats Community Center, 476 Maple Street, Big Flats.
  • The BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF held the second of a series of four fly tying classes  on Saturday, February 25. The class is focused on tying guide flies – flies known for their simplicity and high effectiveness in fooling fish. Some very skilled and experienced fly tyers will be leading the remaining two classes. While the class is closed to new participants, the public is welcome to come, observe, and learn more about fly tying, fly fishing, and the BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF. If interested, read more here. The next class will be held on Saturday, March 4 at 12 pm in the basement meeting room of the Endicott Public Library. On hand to teach will be Joe Cambridge, who has presented at previous BCFF monthly meetings.
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The “Turd”, shown here in fly tying instructor Tim Barrett’s vise, was one of four guide flies taught in this past Saturday’s BCFF Fly Tying class.

  • The Fly Fishing Show is in town. For those who missed the Somerset NJ show, the final “reasonably local” opportunity to attend will be the Lancaster, PA show which will be held Saturday, March 4th through Sunday, March 5th. Exhibitor booths will include non-stop casting demonstrations, seminars, fly-tying, a Women’s Fly Fishing Showcase, Fly Fishing Film Festival, book signings and the newest fly fishing tackle and gear. Fly Fishing Show admission is $15 for one day and $25 for both days. Children under age 5 are free as are Scouts under 16 in uniform. Active military with an ID are $10. Hours are: Sat. – 9 am-5:30 pm; Sun. – 9 am-4:30 pm.

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  • The Eastern Waters Council of IFFF, parent organization of the BC Flyfishers and Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter, is having a contest to bring in new members, called “Giving the Gift Of Membership”. The contest is to encourage current members to buy an IFFF membership as a gift to a fly fishing friend, fishing buddy, or family member. You will be entered in a raffle for a new Sage Rod and Reel. To enter the contest, call Kat Mulqueen (406-222-9369 X106) at IFFF headquarters, tell her you are from the BCFF chapter or TTFR chapter, Eastern Waters Council and that you want to participate in the Giving the Gift of Membership. You will need to provide the giftee name, address and email and pay for their membership. There is also a prize for the club that brings in the most new members. You will be helping your buddy, your Club and the IFFF, and you will be eligible to win an awesome new rod and reel! The contest ends May 1st.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

A few snowflakes will end up falling on Sunday, with light accumulations, from 0-1″, expected, particularly at the higher elevations. MINOR flooding is also possible through Sunday evening, as ground conditions are such that the heavy rainfall received Saturday could cause flooding in some areas.

Colder air sets up and hangs around through Sunday night. More mild air looks to return Monday and stay through midweek, with temperatures possibly reaching into the mid-50s again come Wednesday. We are watching a few batches of rain showers, one on Tuesday and another low-pressure system on Wednesday. Both of which look to shake up the first half of our week. Some snow showers are then possible on the back end of that low-pressure system on Thursday. High pressure takes over Friday and Saturday, as quiet and more seasonable weather returns to the Southern Tier.

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The week ahead in fly fishing: February 20, 2107

Posted in Uncategorized on February 19, 2017 by stflyfisher

An old saying (attributed to Mark Twain) – “If you don’t like the weather in New England, wait a minute.” – seemed to be right on the money as far as this past week’s weather goes. The week was relatively cold, with some overnight temps getting down into the teens, and the area received snow in measured doses from a coastal storm and lingering bands of lake effect snow, but much of the snow pack that built up during the week is gone, thanks to ridiculously warm weekend weather. It was a little too much of a shift for some who prefer shut-in weather while tending to stuffing fly boxes, while others took advantage of spring-like conditions to wet a line.

Fly shop talk: Warm days amidst winter weather, such as those experienced this weekend, always make me think of stoneflies. Following are some facts about these wonderful bugs, the early season versions of which are always happy to greet cold-weary anglers:

  • There are some 3,500 species of stoneflies worldwide, with new species still being discovered. Stoneflies are found everywhere except Antarctica.
  • All species of Plecoptera are intolerant of water pollution and their presence in a stream or still water is usually an indicator of good or excellent water quality.
  • Stoneflies usually spend 10 months to 2 years living and growing as larvae in the water. When ready, the larvae emerge from the water and transform into terrestrial adults. While there is some evidence to suggest that a few species in the West may emerge in open water, stoneflies largely owe their lesser status to a terrestrial emergence style. This keeps them safe from trout at a stage when most mayflies and caddisflies are highly vulnerable. With few exceptions, they emerge by crawling out of the water onto rocks, sticks, or other shoreline objects.
  • Adults are not strong fliers (clumsy is a better word!) and generally stay near the stream or lake they hatched from.
  • The male signals his desire to mate to the female by beating the ground with the tip of his abdomen. The pattern of beats is different for each species. If the female is receptive she replies with a series of taps on the ground with her abdomen. The pattern of taps is different in males and females, and between different species.
  • Mating usually happens on the ground or on vegetation. The female then flies over the water dipping her abdomen in to wash off the eggs, or she swims on the surface while laying eggs. Each female can lay hundreds of eggs.
  • The eggs have a gelatinous coating that swells up and absorbs moisture. This enables some eggs to survive in streams that dry up periodically.
  • Stonefly nymphs are adept “clinger/crawlers.” They have double claws on their tarsi which help them grip and clamber over fast-water rocks, and many of them have flattened bodies to make clinging even easier.

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: The Douglaston Salmon Run has been reporting a series of so-so results until most recently. The weekend’s results have been much better, possibly due to the warmer weather. Anglers had good luck nymphing and in some cases, swinging flies. Whitaker’s is also reporting improved results throughout the river although nice weather has increased the fishing pressure. The upper section of river between Altmar and Pineville had the most fishing pressure, but anglers did land fish in this section. Anglers who fished the Lower Fly Zone reported having the most action on nymphs. Anglers who were willing to walk or fished on drift boats reported landing some fish in the mid section of the river. The anglers who fished the lower section of the river reported good results bottom bouncing or float fishing on egg sacs and beads. Those anglers who were fly fishing did well on stoneflies or egg patterns under an indicator.

Suggested Patterns:

  • Wiggle stone in blue, peacock, chart, pink. size 10
  • Rusher nymph in blue, purple, red, chart. size 10
  • Steelhead hammer in blue, purple, black, red. size 10
  • Black stonefly in size 10.
  • Flashback nymph size 8.
  • Steak-n-eggs in orange, pink, chart. size 10
  • Flash-a-bugger in olive/black. size 8
  • Sucker spawn in peach, cream, white, blue

Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone is optimistic about fishing now that warmer weather will extend into the coming week. He’s reporting that now’s the time for good landlocked salmon fishing!  Here’s John’s lake-by-lake report:

  • Cayuga Lake:  Fishing has been productive for landlocked salmon and brown trout along with occasional rainbows and lakers.  Both fly-and gear fishing is working.   The water level is low here and launching and retrieving boats could be a hassle for some. Expect good lake trout jigging as well as good casting for pickerel/pike.
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing is currently fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  Perch and pike fishing should be good.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout fishing should still be good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout and northern pike fishing should be good here.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Rainbow trout, landlocked salmon and yellow perch fishing should be good here.

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

  • The BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF will be holding its monthly chapter meeting on Thursday, February 23rd at 7 pm at the Endicott Public Library. An informal fly tying demonstration at 6:30 pm will precede the main meeting. The presentation topic is HUNT MONSTER BROWN TROUT in NEW ZEALAND. Frank Cole and his companion, Steve Pettit, will talk about their journey in 2011 to beautiful New Zealand to catch trophy Brown Trout. They trek the lower third of the South Island over several rivers and lakes with Simon, their demanding NZ guide, through “chubby rain”, cold and heat. Perhaps, the most beautiful place to fish for trout in the world, the scenery is stunning and the trout are amazing!
  • The BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF held the first of a series of four fly tying classes  on Saturday, February 11. The class is focused on tying guide flies – flies known for their simplicity and high effectiveness in fooling fish. Some very skilled and experienced fly tyers will be leading the remaining three classes. While the class is closed to new participants, the public is welcome to come, observe, and learn more about fly tying, fly fishing, and the BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF. If interested, read more here. The next class will be held on Saturday, February 25 at 9 am in the basement meeting room of the Endicott Public Library.
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John Trainor’s fly tying tools of the trade were on display during February 11th’s fly tying class. The next class on February 25th will feature more guide flies. Picture courtesy of BCFF Chapter President, Nick DiNunzio.

  • The Fly Fishing Show is in town. For those who missed the Somerset NJ show, the final “reasonably local” opportunity to attend will be the Lancaster, PA show which will be held Saturday, March 4th through Sunday, March 5th. Exhibitor booths will include non-stop casting demonstrations, seminars, fly-tying, a Women’s Fly Fishing Showcase, Fly Fishing Film Festival, book signings and the newest fly fishing tackle and gear. Fly Fishing Show admission is $15 for one day and $25 for both days. Children under age 5 are free as are Scouts under 16 in uniform. Active military with an ID are $10. Hours are: Sat. – 9 am-5:30 pm; Sun. – 9 am-4:30 pm.

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  • The Eastern Waters Council of IFFF, parent organization of the BC Flyfishers and Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter, is having a contest to bring in new members, called “Giving the Gift Of Membership”. The contest is to encourage current members to buy an IFFF membership as a gift to a fly fishing friend, fishing buddy, or family member. You will be entered in a raffle for a new Sage Rod and Reel. To enter the contest, call Kat Mulqueen (406-222-9369 X106) at IFFF headquarters, tell her you are from the BCFF chapter or TTFR chapter, Eastern Waters Council and that you want to participate in the Giving the Gift of Membership. You will need to provide the giftee name, address and email and pay for their membership. There is also a prize for the club that brings in the most new members. You will be helping your buddy, your Club and the IFFF, and you will be eligible to win an awesome new rod and reel! The contest ends May 1st.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

 

A weak cold front is drifting in from the north, and looks to make Monday and Tuesday a little cooler. Sun will dominate on Monday, before clouds increase overnight Monday ahead of our next chance for precipitation Tuesday night. Temperatures rebound Wednesday and Thursday into the low- to mid-50s as high pressure returns and keeps our weather fairly quiet. Average high temperatures for this time of year are in the low-30s. Another low-pressure system looks to develop off the eastern Rocky Mountains and move northeastward toward us. This system puts the chance for rain showers back in the forecast and drop temperatures off the table for next Sunday, as we return to more seasonable temperatures.

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The week ahead in fly fishing: February 13, 2107

Posted in Fishing Conditions, Fishing Reports, Flies - Local Favorites, Trout Fishing, Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , on February 12, 2017 by stflyfisher

February has proven to be an interesting month thus far with ups and downs in temperatures, snow, and rain. The good thing is that we’ve had a good amount of precipitation which is very much needed after a long summer drought. And while the weather might be a little sloppy, there’s a lot to do in terms of local activities to keep the blood pumping for spring fly fishing.

Fly shop talk: I’ve mentioned the book “Younger Next Year” in my blog before. For those who have not read it, it’s a fantastic read and one that could make a huge difference in your life on many fronts. The book stresses seven factors that can lead to a great life in “the third chapter” of life, including physical fitness and proper diet, but one of the most important of all of those is “connection” or social interaction. Studies have shown that remaining connected in the later years of life is important to longevity. And this came to mind as I sat at my “bench” and enjoyed the fellowship of anglers, young and old, while fly tying at the BC Flyfisher’s recent fly tying class. We are, after all, social animals. And while I do enjoy being out on a river on my own, rubbing elbows with other like-minded fly anglers can promote a deep sense of connection and also, of course, improve one as an angler. This is a great reason to join a local fly fishing organization and get out and stay connected.

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: The Douglaston Salmon Run has been reporting “so – so” results most recently. Weather has certainly been a factor limiting the number of anglers but reports from the anglers who have fished have been mixed, but more on the “zero” side. Flows have recently increased to levels that will challenge wading anglers. Whitaker’s Sports Store and Motel is reporting some success for the upper end of the river for anglers bottom bouncing flies.

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Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone is recommending that Finger Lakes anglers sign up to become a DEC Diary Keeper. The DEC is always looking for participants for Region 7 (Cayuga/Owasco/Otisco/Skaneateles) or for neighboring Region 8 (Seneca/Canandaigua/Keuka/Canadice/Hemlock).  It’s easy to participate and your information (length of trip, number of anglers fishing, fish caught et.al.) will help DEC with management decisions.  Even if you only fish a few days a season, your info can help.  Click here: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9218.html  and scroll to the bottom for more info.

Here’s the lake – by – lake report from John:

  • Cayuga Lake:  Fishing has been productive for landlocked salmon and brown trout along with occasional rainbows and lakers.  Both fly and gear fishing is working. The water level is low here and launching and retrieving boats could be a hassle for some.
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing is currently fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  Perch and pike fishing should be good.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout fishing should still be good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout and northern pike fishing should be good here.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Rainbow trout, landlocked salmon and yellow perch fishing should be good here.

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

  • The BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF will be holding its monthly chapter meeting on Thursday, February 22nd at 7 pm at the Endicott Public Library. An informal fly tying demonstration at 6:30 pm will precede the main meeting. The presentation topic is HUNT MONSTER BROWN TROUT in NEW ZEALAND. Frank Cole and his companion, Steve Pettit, will talk about their journey in 2011 to beautiful New Zealand to catch trophy Brown Trout. They trek the lower third of the South Island over several rivers and lakes with Simon, their demanding NZ guide, through “chubby rain”, cold and heat. Perhaps, the most beautiful place to fish for trout in the world, the scenery is stunning and the trout are amazing!
  • The BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF held the first of a series of four fly tying classes  on Saturday, February 11. The class will focus on tying guide flies – flies known for their simplicity and high effectiveness in fooling fish. Some very skilled and experienced fly tyers will be leading the remaining three classes. While the class is closed to new participants, the public is welcome to come, observe, and learn more about fly tying, fly fishing, and the BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF. If interested, read more here. The next class will be held on Saturday, February 25 at 9 am in the basement meeting room of the Endicott Public Library.
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John Trainor’s “Frenchie” nymph can be seen in his vise in this picture taken at the first of four “guide fly” fly tying classes held this past Saturday, February 11th.

  • The Fly Fishing Show is in town. For those who missed the Somerset NJ show, the final “reasonably local” opportunity to attend will be the Lancaster, PA show which will be held Saturday, March 4th through Sunday, March 5th. Exhibitor booths will include non-stop casting demonstrations, seminars, fly-tying, a Women’s Fly Fishing Showcase, Fly Fishing Film Festival, book signings and the newest fly fishing tackle and gear. Fly Fishing Show admission is $15 for one day and $25 for both days. Children under age 5 are free as are Scouts under 16 in uniform. Active military with an ID are $10. Hours are: Sat. – 9 am-5:30 pm; Sun. – 9 am-4:30 pm.

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  • The Eastern Waters Council of IFFF, parent organization of the BC Flyfishers and Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter, is having a contest to bring in new members, called “Giving the Gift Of Membership”. The contest is to encourage current members to buy an IFFF membership as a gift to a fly fishing friend, fishing buddy, or family member. You will be entered in a raffle for a new Sage Rod and Reel. To enter the contest, call Kat Mulqueen (406-222-9369 X106) at IFFF headquarters, tell her you are from the BCFF chapter or TTFR chapter, Eastern Waters Council and that you want to participate in the Giving the Gift of Membership. You will need to provide the giftee name, address and email and pay for their membership. There is also a prize for the club that brings in the most new members. You will be helping your buddy, your Club and the IFFF, and you will be eligible to win an awesome new rod and reel! The contest ends May 1st.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

A WINTER STORM WARNING is in effect from 7am Sunday to 1pm Monday for our area for a wintry mix that will begin early Sunday morning, then rain, sleet, freezing rain, and snow will continue through Sunday night, with snow continuing Monday.

Look for a wintry mix of sleet and snow on Sunday with 1-4″ of sleet and snow possible during the day in Broome and Tioga counties, while 3-7″ of sleet and snow may fall during the day in Chenango, Otsego, and Delaware counties. On Sunday night this wintry mix will be transitioning to all snow with a total snowfall of 2-6″ possible for Broome and Tioga counties and 6-10″ with isolated areas of 12″ possible for Chenango, Otsego, and Delaware counties come lunch time Monday.

 

Our next storm system looks to affect the Southern Tier on Wednesday, with the chance for some snow showers. We’ll then keep a slight chance of showers in the forecast each day as we wrap up the work week.

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Looking ahead to 2017…

Posted in Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , , on February 8, 2017 by stflyfisher

“Hope
Smiles from the threshold of the year to come,
Whispering ‘it will be happier’…”
― Alfred Tennyson

Anglers are a hopeful bunch, and perhaps the hope curve is highest this time of the year, when angling is still months away for us in the Southern Tier. Snow, ice, and arctic air might contain us, but within us our imaginations run like roaring rivers about what might be in 2017. We are hopeful in the pause of winter. We look back on the year, re-live the great moments on the water and learn from the not-so-great and then turn our gaze forward. We turn to tying flies, building rods, cleaning equipment, spooling lines, patching waders, and studding boots. And we dream and plan…

I set goals in most areas of my life, including fly fishing. I think the act of goal-setting is important in becoming a better angler. Goals stir us to action and hopefully, force us out of our comfort zone. It’s rare when I achieve everything I set out to do; in fact, if I hit 70 – 80% of my targets, I consider it a very good year, indeed.

All in all, 2016 was a decent year. A few factors and events influenced my results both negatively and positively. Because of the extreme drought, for example, I was much less of a trout fisherman this year and much more of a river rat, so that had an impact on some of my goals. The purchase of investment property in Florida also added a dimension to my fly fishing that was not in the plans back in January, 2016.

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So it is with planning and goals. General Dwight D. Eisenhower, architect of the D-Day Invasion, once said that plans are useless but planning is necessary. My take on his quote goes along the lines of another version of it – that no plan ever survives “first contact with the enemy.” The crux and irony of planning is that one needs to do it to preclude failure but since so many factors change the course of events and impact plans, one must not be rigid to a plan and should only use it as a guideline. One must be committed to the goal or objective, but remain fluid with respect to the plan to achieve it.

So looking forward, I hope to set goals that help me achieve a higher level of effectiveness as a fly fisherman but not keep me from pursuing opportunities as they arise…

Here’s how I did in 2016:

  1. Learn more about nymph fishing – I read a little of Joe Humphreys and George Daniel’s works but as mentioned previously, a lack of trout fishing kept me from doing much in this area. Call this 10% complete.
  2. Learn to fly fish for musky. Per my 2016 plan, I purchased a new musky fly rod – a beautiful Scott Tidal “MP” 9′ 10 weight, and a Lamson Liquid Reel Pack to go with it (1 reel with two additional spare spools). I still need to purchase fly lines and then tie flies, study, and lastly, intentionally fish for these apex predators. Call this 20% complete.
  3. Saltwater flyfish in Destin, FL. – As mentioned in my Looking Back on 2016 post, I was able to wet a line a few times in Destin and had some fly fishing success as a newbie. 100% COMPLETE.
  4. Continue fly tying – learn to tie 5 more patterns. Thanks to last year’s BCFF Fly Tying Class, this is 100% COMPLETE.
  5. Donate a box of my flies to the TU banquet. The Al Hazzard TU banquet, a ritual of Spring was not held in 2016. Initially, it was rescheduled to late 2016, but it never actually happened. I’ll remove this goal for 2017 unless I see the event scheduled.
  6. Float-fish the Susquehanna (4X) – I did only one float of the Susquehanna this year, mainly because Mollie, my prized all weather fly fishing vehicle, was given away early in 2016, her rusted frame not able to pass another NY state inspection. I did not see a way to transport my small kayak to the river, as my wife’s SUV did not have a roof rack, but come fall, my interior design wife – the ultimate packer – showed how I could fit my kayak inside our SUV. So 1X could have been 4X after all. Call this 25% complete.
  7. Make perfect fly casting practice a habit. 100% COMPLETE.
  8. Fish with friends, including at least 3 trips with new friends. I fished with 11 different friends in 2017. 100% COMPLETE.
  9. Fly fish and/or attend fly fishing events 100 times this year. I also accomplished my goal of fishing / attending fly fishing events 100 times. This was a stretch goal but well worth it. 100% COMPLETE.
  10. Learn to tie 3 new fishing knots. 0% COMPLETE.
  11. Fish the Salmon River – Spring, Fall, Winter. I fished for steelhead in the spring and got out once for the fall Salmon run. 66% COMPLETE.
  12. Night fish for trout. 0% COMPLETE.
  13. Fish marginal waters. 0% COMPLETE.
  14. Build my own fly rod. As profiled here in early 2016, I built my first fly rod courtesy of the BC Flyfishers and expert rod maker, Joe Swam. 100% COMPLETE.

Putting a final measure on my results, I’d say I was a little over 50% effective in achieving my 2016 goals.

As most who have read previous “looking ahead” posts know, my process for goal setting starts with a look back and recounting of the year past, usually in December. Once that is done, I begin to plan for the year ahead in early January, mull my draft goals over through the rest of January and early February, and post them – a formal commitment – before my birthday in early March. This year I’m ahead of schedule…

My fly fishing goals for 2017:

  1. Learn more about nymph fishing – study Joe Humphreys’ “Trout Tactics”
  2. Learn to fly fish for muskie.
    1. Purchase line and leader
    2. Tie flies
    3. Study muskie fly fishing
    4. Fish for them
  3. Saltwater flyfish in Destin, FL.
    1. Fish the bay for redfish & trout.
    2. Fish the inlet / surf.
  4. Continue fly tying – learn to tie 5 more patterns.
  5. Float-fish the local warmwater rivers (4X)
  6. Fly fish, practice casting, or attend fly fishing events 125 times this year.
  7. Learn to build leaders. for a
    1. Buy kit
    2. Buy micrometer
    3. Fish my leaders
  8. Night fish for trout.
  9. Fish marginal waters.
  10. Build more fly rods / advance my rod building skills:
    1. Fly rod for my brother-in-law for his 60th birthday
    2. “River Rat” prototype.
    3. “Bay Rat” prototype.
  11. Search for the ideal river boat.

So here’s to achieving fly fishing goals in 2017! In the words of Saint Gerome (340 – 420), father of the Latin church: “Good, better, best, never let it rest. ‘Til your good is better and your better is best.”

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The week ahead in fly fishing: February 6, 2107

Posted in Uncategorized on February 5, 2017 by stflyfisher

February opened with colder temps and some more of the white stuff hitting the ground. The weather has definitely turned more winter-like and local waterways are running at nice levels with ice forming on the smaller waters. On a recent hike I took through Jones Park, the tiny brook that bares no name that slips and slides through a heavily forested glen was shouldered with snow and many of its pools had significant ice cover – all good for the native brook trout that call that little trickle home.

jones-brook

Fly shop talk: The great scientist Louis Pasteur once said, “Chance favors the prepared mind”. I’m a huge proponent of preparation in fly fishing and there’s no better time to get ready for fishing than these cold snowy days of winter. Fly lines should be cleaned and stored in large open coils, reels should be cleaned and oiled, and rods should be cleaned and treated to a nice coating of wax on the blank. Wading gear should be checked – everything from waders to wading staff, belt, and boots. Don’t forget to replace frayed laces and missing studs. Lastly, a good fireside activity besides fly tying is to organize your boxes, leaders, and other fly fishing accessories.

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Great Lakes / Finger Lakes tributaries: The Douglaston Salmon Run continues to report a mix of fishing results. Flows have recently dropped, which is a good thing for anglers, but heavy snow has no doubt also had an impact on fishing access. Roads are reportedly clear as is parking access for most DEC parking lots. The area received over 2 feet of lake effect snow as of Friday.

 

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Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone is recommending that Finger Lakes anglers sign up to become a DEC Diary Keeper. The DEC is always looking for participants for Region 7 (Cayuga/Owasco/Otisco/Skaneateles) or Region 8 (Seneca/Canandaigua/Keuka/Canadice/Hemlock).  It’s easy to participate and your information (length of trip, number of anglers fishing, fish caught et.al.) will help DEC with management decisions.  Even if you only fish a few days a season, your info can help.  Click here: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9218.html  and scroll to the bottom for more info.

Here’s the lake – by – lake report from John:

  • Cayuga Lake:  Fishing has been productive for landlocked salmon and brown trout along with occasional rainbows and lakers.  Both fly and gear fishing is working. The water level is low here and launching and retrieving boats could be a hassle for some.
  • Seneca Lake:  Fishing is currently fair to good for landlocked salmon and brown trout.  Perch and pike fishing should be good.
  • Keuka Lake:  Lake trout fishing should still be good here.
  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout and northern pike fishing should be good here.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Rainbow trout, landlocked salmon and yellow perch fishing should be good here.

Fly fishing events: Here’s a summary of upcoming events:

  • The BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF will be holding its monthly chapter meeting on Thursday, February 22nd at 7 pm at the Endicott Public Library. An informal fly tying demonstration at 6:30 pm will precede the main meeting. The presentation topic is HUNT MONSTER BROWN TROUT in NEW ZEALAND. Frank Cole and his companion, Steve Pettit, will talk about their journey in 2011 to beautiful New Zealand to catch trophy Brown Trout. They trek the lower third of the South Island over several rivers and lakes with Simon, their demanding NZ guide, through “chubby rain”, cold and heat. Perhaps, the most beautiful place to fish for trout in the world, the scenery is stunning and the trout are amazing!
  • The BC Flyfishers chapter of IFFF will be holding its own fly tying class. The class will focus on tying guide flies – flies known for their simplicity and high effectiveness in fooling fish. Some very skilled and experienced fly tyers will be leading the four classes. If interested, read more here and be sure to sign up soon as materials need to be ordered. The first class will be held on Saturday, February 11.
  • The Fly Fishing Show is still in town. For those who missed the Somerset NJ show, the final “reasonably local” opportunity to attend will be the Lancaster, PA show which will be held Saturday, March 4th through Sunday, March 5th. Exhibitor booths will include non-stop casting demonstrations, seminars, fly-tying, a Women’s Fly Fishing Showcase, Fly Fishing Film Festival, book signings and the newest fly fishing tackle and gear. Fly Fishing Show admission is $15 for one day and $25 for both days. Children under age 5 are free as are Scouts under 16 in uniform. Active military with an ID are $10. Hours are: Sat. – 9 am-5:30 pm; Sun. – 9 am-4:30 pm.
  • On February 6, the Twin Tiers Five Rivers chapter of IFFF will be hosting their popular Social Night at 1157 North, an Italian restaurant located in Elmira, NY. This quaint restaurant has been in this Elmira residential area for more than 60 years. Spouses, family members or fishing buddies are encouraged to enjoy the evening with chapter members. The speaker for the evening will be Linda Wales, President of A Hope for Lyme Inc. Linda, a Lyme disease survivor, will be talking about the disease and the impact it has had on her and others she knows. Lyme disease is caused by tick bites and can result in severe health issues. The disease often causes a variety of complications including pains in the muscles and joints, severe fatigue and cognitive issues. Ticks that carry Lyme disease and other serious pathogens are present in our area, so it’s important to be aware of the risk. The social night will start at 6:00 pm with hors d’oeuvres and cash bar followed by dinner at 7:00 pm. Linda’s presentation will be after dinner. The cost for this event is $25 per person and will include a choice of one of three entrée selections  – Chicken Parmesan, Eggplant Parmesan, or  Carne Grande. All meals include a tossed salad, coffee, tea, and dessert. See the chapter’s website for more information and note that reservations must be made and payment received no later than Monday, January 30th.

The week ahead weather: WBNG’s week-ahead weather forecast is as follows:

A low-pressure system will pass to our north Sunday, bringing with it the chance for some snow showers. The highest chance of snow appears to be north and east of Binghamton, with the lesser chance off to the south and west. The snow will continue through the evening hours with total accumulations up to 1 inch with some locally higher amounts possible. Our weather pattern quiets down on Monday as high pressure passes to our south. West-northwest winds may bring a few flurries off the lake, but minimal accumulations are expected if any snow showers occur. Tuesday brings the next weather-maker to the Southern Tier, and is the focal point of the next seven days. A strong low-pressure system looks to organize off the Rocky Mountains and push northeast. Precipitation appears to start as snow/freezing rain/sleet in the morning on Tuesday, before transitioning to all rain as temperatures warm through the day Tuesday. Temperatures well above average are expected Tuesday as this strong system drags warm air up from the Deep South. Snow then becomes more likely overnight Tuesday and Wednesday as colder air wraps around the system as it moves northeast. Winds look to pick up Wednesday and Thursday, with Wednesday night being the transition period as much colder air moves right back into the Twin Tiers.

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