Archive for the Carp Category

The week ahead in fly fishing: July 25

Posted in Carp, Fishing Conditions, Fishing Reports, Flies - Local Favorites, Smallmouth Bass Fishing, Trout Fishing, Uncategorized, Writing with tags , , , , on July 24, 2016 by stflyfisher

This is the first “week ahead” fly fishing report on Southern Tier Fly Fisher. As explained in a previous post, my weekly reports and other fly fishing articles will reside here until I have a new improved site in place.

It’s hot out there, and I should start my report by saying these are tough times for trout, particularly for the resident fish that inhabit local creeks. A recent stop at an access on the West Branch of Owego Creek was enough to remind me that this is not the time to stress coldwater species. My recommendation is to focus on warmwater stuff – brownlining as I sometimes refer to it. Take time to explore the many great warmwater fisheries we have and leave the high octane guys alone for a while.

Summer heat is here although we’ve had a string of cool nights to check the oppressive daytime temps. In our neck of the woods, watering corn fields is pretty much unheard of but I recently observed it in action for some newly sprouted corn. That says something. Some areas are harder hit than others – lawns are a good barometer.

Here’s the fly fishing report for the week ahead:

Catskill Rivers: The West Branch Angler reports that after several days with very warm air temps it was nice to wake up today to a river with some more cold water running through it. The West Branch at Hale Eddy is flowing a nice 822 this morning, a great little cold water bump that will help keep more downriver sections cooler during this heat wave. The increased release is always a good thing, giving the slower moving sections of water a bit more texture throughout the river. The Sulphurs are still coming off consistently starting in the early afternoon hours up around Deposit. Even though it doesn’t look like much cloud cover over the next few days you will likely see a few BWO’s in the 18-22 range as well as some 14-16 Cahills. The Isonychia are still around in small numbers. Terrestrials are always safe bets this time of year so don’t forget the ants and beetles. Nymphing on the upper West has been pretty tough due to the algae in the water but the extra flow should help clear it out a bit. Downriver, say on the lower half of the West, the algae isn’t nearly as bad and nymphing is much easier.

Local streams and creeks: The creeks and small streams in our area are incredibly low, clear, and on the warm side right now. It’s best to leave these waters alone as long as the heat and dry conditions prevail. If you do fish, fish early or late and try to land and release fish quickly.

Lakes: John Gaulke of Finger Lakes Angling Zone reports that Lake Trout action is top-notch on Cayuga and Owasco Lakes. Cayuga will likely provide some excellent fishing over the next 6 weeks at the very least. Cayuga Lake is usually good for all day action in August. Here’s John’s lake-by-lake report:

  • Owasco Lake:  Lake trout action is top notch. Angling Zone friend/client Rick nabbed an 11lb brown here late last week.  It was a 28″er! Bass fishing is decent. There’s no shortage of bait on this lake.
  • Cayuga Lake:  Fishing here ranges from very good to excellent for lake trout. There are good numbers of sizeable lakers throughout the lake.
  • Seneca Lake:  Lake trout fishing should be fair to good. Plenty of weeds are floating around. Angling Zone Friend/Client Andrew nailed a giant brown here recently.
  • Skaneateles Lake:  Smallmouth bass fishing should be good to excellent. Lake trout action should be fair to good.
  • Otisco Lake:  Tiger musky fishing had been good with some very large fish around. Bass fishing should be good.

Ponds: Ponds are definitely dropping and warming. Bass and sunfish are very active and willing partners to fly fishermen under these conditions, but low light early or late is best. Topwater is a good choice and don’t forget the damselfly, grasshopper, cricket, and beetle patterns. Poppers will work well along weedlines and lilly pads.

Warmwater rivers: All of the warmwater rivers are running clear, low and warm. Water temps are in the 75 – 80 degree range and wading is very easy with the low flows. Reports have been mixed. Smallmouth bass can be found hunting around the weeds and structure during the mornings and evenings. You’ll also find them hanging in the tailouts of pools chasing bait, sometimes in very skinny water, but mainly when the light is low. During the day, the bass will be deep and in the riffles and runs. Hellgrammite and crayfish imitations fished like a nymph will work well. Channel catfish and fallfish will also be found in the mix. And carp are now pretty active all day long in the weedy pools and tailouts. They can be caught with buggy-looking nymphs and crayfish imitations. Sight-fishing can be especially effective to mudding fish. The white fly hatch is due to start any time now. I’ve seen a few white flies coming off towards evening but nothing of significance yet. Once the hatch gets going, be prepared for terrific topwater flyfishing.

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The Susquehanna River, shown here, is flowing low and clear. Flows recently dropped below 1,000 CFS, making for great wet wading on these hot summer days.

Fly fishing events: Area fly fishing clubs and chapters take the months of July and August off so there is nothing to report here. However, one noteworthy announcement is the following press release concerning the work that Gary Romanic, VP of the BC Flyfishers has done to secure a large donation to reach out to veterans in our area and offer fly fishing opportunities and instruction:

Binghamton, NY – Broome County Executive Debbie Preston, Broome County Legislators, and Director of Veteran Services Brian Vojtisek joined the Broome County Veterans Fly Fishing Program to discuss details of a recent donation to help the program. Broome County recently gave $10,000 to the program to help offset costs for travel to fly fishing destinations to facilitate fly fishing instruction.

“As you know, veterans hold a very special place in my heart and I’m willing to help them out in any way that I can,” says Broome County Executive Debbie Preston.  “Fly fishing is a wonderful activity and I’m on board with anything we can do to help our local veterans live the best possible life they can after sacrificing a part of their life for this Country.”

The mission of the Binghamton Veteran Fly Fishers is to lift the morale and support the welfare of Broome County veterans. “We want to thank the County Executive and Brian Vojtisek in the Veterans Services Office for this wonderful donation,” says Gary Romanic, vice president of the Broome County Veterans Fly Fishing program.  “This money will go a long way in not only getting the veterans to prime fly fishing areas, but also to provide instruction to those who have never fished before.”

“When we were approached for a donation last year, we were delighted to help,” says Director of Veteran Services Brian Vojtisek.  “This program fits into our mission of helping veterans financially, and in adjusting to a return to civilian life.”This is a one-time donation.

The week ahead weather: The weather for the week ahead will be mainly summer sizzle with the usual thunderstorm potential on Monday and Friday and if you can believe it, showers on Sunday at the end of the week. Highs will range in the upper 80’s to low 90’s with lows in the low 60’s. There will be relief at the end of the week with highs dropping to the high 70’s / low 80’s. Tuesday and Wednesday will have bright sun. And speaking of sun, this is the time of year to be extra vigilant with regards to sun protection. Cover up with protective clothing or lather up with sun screen. And don’t forget a hat and sunglasses. The eyes can suffer on bright days and a good pair of polarized sunglasses will definitely help in spotting fish.

 

 

 

 

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Pond surprise: Grassie on the fly…

Posted in Carp, Uncategorized with tags , , , on May 19, 2014 by stflyfisher

Just a quick saunter behind my house lies a pond. I’ve profiled it here before. Easily viewed from our deck, it’s about 1.5 acres in size, shaped like a kidney bean with one half much larger than the other, and with a small overgrown island dotting its middle.

The view from my backyard deck...

The view from my backyard deck…

It’s an old pond by most accounts. One third of it has good depth – well over 10 feet – and because of this it is one pond that seemed to survive the fish kills reported this spring by many pond owners in the Southern Tier – the presumed result of a very frigid winter and low oxygen. The rest of the pond, however, is fairly shallow with depths of 2 to 4 feet.

Fall on Grippen Pond.

The pond, looking west over the shallows…

I stocked the pond with bass after we purchased our home. Over two summers, I dutifully caught and carefully introduced “breeder” bass as well as stockie size bass, along with lots of fathead minnows. The pond was already teeming with small, and seemingly stunted, sunfish.

These days I cruise the pond in a small kayak. In early spring, a wooly bugger stripped slowly over bottom will always catch bass along with an occasional hand-sized sunfish. Once temps warm up, however, the pond slowly grows “hair”. Duck weed crowds the banks, cattails sprout up, and all sorts of water veggies fill the shallows. It’s not long before a popper is the only way to fish. As summer heats up, the bass lay in the weedy shallows, and each evening, the pond awakens with the sound of bass crashing prey.

The bass are getting some size to them these days…

A great gamefish for the flyfisher...

A great gamefish for the flyfisher…

…and I’ve caught a number of big sunfish on bass-sized wooly buggers and poppers. Some of these brilliantly colored “pumpkinseeds” have mouths big enough to lip.

But there’s another fish in town. Our neighbor, and pond owner, had introduced a dozen grass carp a few years ago as a way, futile though it seems to be, to combat heavy aquatic weed infestation. These fish have grown big in the rich and weedy waters of the pond…

Grippen pond at dusk.  Not safe for swimmers...

Grippen pond at dusk in August. A weedy paradise…

Grass carp grow rapidly and that seems to be the case with the fish in the pond. I’ve watched them swim gracefully about, have seen them feeding at the surface, and have spooked them while quietly stalking bass in the shallows. Spooking a big grass carp is akin to throwing a hand grenade in the water. Their power, like big river carp, is impressive to say the least. And I’ve read a bit about them – that while they are mainly herbivores, they can apparently be caught on some baits and flies. Some innovative fly tyers have even developed flies that mimic aquatic vegetation.

A very life-like grass carp fly...

A very life-like grass carp fly…

I’ve thought about tying up something along these lines and sight fishing them. But starting late spring, my quarry is largemouth bass. I love their bad-ass ways. What better way to spend a pleasant Saturday evening…

This past Saturday evening I decided to hit the pond in usual style. I fished a chartreuse colored popper – a classic bass pattern with a lot of hackle and long yellow legs. It’s cup-faced for noise with a good sized hook (#2) and I fished it all of the bassie places. My first fish was a huge sunfish, ablaze with pumpkinseed colors, its belly big. I released it quickly, thinking it might be a pre-spawn female. I then went on to catch a number of bass. Most of their takes were explosive, as were their leaps for freedom. And then I had a take I just didn’t understand.

In between “chugs” – popper sitting – wake rings subsiding – it just seemed to disappear in the water. I lifted my rod and connected to something solid and heavy, accompanied by a good bit of thrashing. Then I saw a blackish back, silvery sides, and a broad tail and knew this was no bass.

I got my line on the reel and waited for the run. It didn’t happen at first. The fish thrashed about, shook it’s head, apparently comprehending the resistance this bug was giving it. Then it took off, my 9 foot rod bucking, reel screaming. It made a few nice runs like that, zigged and zagged under my kayak, towed me all about the pond. As it finally tired I began to think, there’s no way I can land this fish in the kayak. So I played it some more and slowly back-paddled to a shallow bank, where I beached it.

Grassie with a chartreuse lollipop...

Grassie with a chartreuse lollipop…

I was pretty impressed with this grass carp. They are far more pleasing to the eye than their golden cousin and their mouths are a lot more, well, fish-like. This one had quite the gut too, though I’ve seen a few in the pond that are even bigger.

Fishing friend Eric once confided that he never fly fishes for carp intentionally, but has no problem crossing one. That has been my experience as well. I’ve landed only a few big golden bones on the local rivers while fishing for smallmouth, and have straightened my leader on far too many that almost got away with my fly line. Maybe one day I will get so addicted that I’ll drop everything to intentionally fish for them. For now, however, it’s almost better just running into them by accident. After all, there’s that first moment of “what the hell is this”, followed by, “it’s big whatever it is”, followed by, “better get it on the reel”, followed by, “hang on”… And who’d a thunk – a carp on a popper! A fly fishing first, perhaps?

Nothing better than a Saturday evening on a pond...

Nothing better than a Saturday evening on a pond…